EVERYONE IS A PEDESTRIAN
 
 

Pedestrian Safety
Every year, an average of 250 pedestrians within Pima County are injured while crossing the street. Of those, about 20 are killed. That’s 20 men, women or children who will never go home again.

Probably more injuries and deaths than you thought.

We all play a role in safety, whether we are a pedestrian, bicyclist or driving a motor vehicle. Let's start by following the rules of the road and watching out for each other. Walk Safe. Drive Safe.

 

How Street Smart Are You?

 

 
     TEXTING AND WALKING DON'T MIX
 
 

Pledge To Be Safe

Make a difference in our community by taking the Pedestrian Safety Pledge! Share what you learn with your family and friends. It could save someone's life.  

 

TAKE THE PEDESTRIAN SAFETY PLEDGE (click all that apply)

AS A PEDESTRIAN:
I will cross streets when it is safe at push-button crossings.
I will walk defensively and not assume drivers will yield to me, even in a crosswalk.
I will look up, be aware and know my surroundings.
I will be visible to others at night by wearing bright colors or carrying a flashlight.

AS A DRIVER:
I will slow down and follow the speed limit.
I will not drink and drive.   
I will wear my seatbelt and make sure others in the vehicle are wearing their seatbelts.
I will look out for and yield to pedestrians.

AS A BICYCLIST:
I will always wear a helmet.
I will use lights at night to be seen by others.
I will ride on the right, ride with traffic.
I will not ride on the sidewalk.

 
 
    LOOK BOTH WAYS BEFORE CROSSING
 
 

About Us

Pima Association of Governments launched this campaign to help increase pedestrian safety in Pima County.

PAG works to ensure our region enjoys quality transportation, a healthy economy and a sustainable environment.
 
As the federally designated metropolitan planning organization, PAG manages and coordinates cross-jurisdictional transportation planning, environmental planning and technical services with PAG members.

In the PAG region, various resources, including other safety programs and outreach materials, are available to make Pima County a safer place to walk, bike and drive.

 

         

Bicycle/Pedestrian HAWK crossing at Speedway Blvd and 10th Ave

 

Regional Pedestrian Plan

PAG has developed a Regional Pedestrian Plan in order to respond to the challenges facing our pedestrian environment. Due to higher-than-average pedestrian fatality rates, Tucson was named a Pedestrian Safety Focus City by the Federal Highway Administration.

The Regional Pedestrian Plan emphasizes the importance of walking as a mode of transportation in the Tucson region and has established pedestrian improvement priorities, including specific goals.
 

 

 

Regional Transportation Authority

Projects in the Regional Transportation Authority’s 20-year plan have contributed to overall multimodal safety in Pima County. The RTA, which is managed by Pima Association of Governments, has completed 48 of 80 promised pedestrian safety crossings, 109 miles of 250 miles of promised sidewalks, 226 miles of 550 miles of promised bike lanes and 149 of 200 promised intersection safety improvements. The RTA plan, which is entering its 10th year, was approved by Pima County voters in 2006. To date, the RTA has invested $740 million in transportation improvements funded by the regional half-cent excise tax also approved by voters.

 

Credit

PAG thanks and credits Arizona Department of Transportation and Pima County Bicycle and Pedestrian Program for use of its content, which contributed to WalkSafeDriveSafe.com. All other statistics used on this site are taken from PAG's Regional Pedestrian Plan.
 

 

 
    CROSS AT MARKED CROSSWALKS
 
 

Pedestrian Safety Tips

 

 
Every 1½ days, a pedestrian is struck by a motor vehicle in Pima County.

That adds up to 250 to 300 pedestrian injuries as a result of crashes with motor vehicles. Everyone is at risk, especially children and the elderly, whether behind the wheel of a car, riding a bike to school or walking across the street at a designated crosswalk.

Being aware of safety laws and tips will help our region be a safer place for everyone.

  
 
         
     


BE ALERT AROUND THE STREETCAR 

Don’t walk or stand on the tracks. Use pedestrian walkways and crosswalks. Streetcar is quiet. Listen for warning bells and look for headlights. Adults should hold children’s hands near tracks and on platforms. Stand behind the textured strips on platforms.
 

 
 


BE AWARE OF YOUR SURROUNDINGS

Headphones and cell phones cause distraction and reduce your ability to hear traffic. Your ears are your first line of defense when walking or running near traffic.

   
 

BE VISIBLE TO MOTORISTS

On roadways without sidewalks, walk facing traffic whenever possible and at night wear bright colored reflective clothing and carry lights. Make sure you and your children are as visible as possible. Remember, drivers do their best to avoid you if they can see you!
 

     
   

ASSUME THAT DRIVERS
MAY NOT STOP

A marked crosswalk does not assure your safety. Make sure that all vehicles are stopped before crossing each lane.

 
 

 

 
    WEAR A HELMET
 
 

Bicycle Safety Tips

In the Tucson region, about 1 in 30 people commute to work by bike. That’s five times the national average.

Bicycling, a well-used mode of travel, is so popular that the region has over 1,000 miles of infrastructure - one of the highest amounts in the country - dedicated to bicycling.

Yet, bicyclists, like pedestrians, also are considered "vulnerable users." It's important to protect yourself and follow the rules of the road. 

 
 
         
 


USE A HEADLIGHT

Wear white or brightly colored shirts and consider reflective clothing for nighttime use. A white front headlight and red rear reflector are required on your bike if you ride at night. You should also use a red rear taillight.

 


PROTECT YOURSELF

According to national studies, 85% of brain injuries can be prevented by wearing a helmet.
Pima County and City of Tucson laws require all bicyclists under the age of 18 to wear a helmet.

 
 


USE HAND SIGNALS

Use hand signals to show your intentions and ride in a predictable manner.
Remember, the laws are there to make it safer for everyone.

 


NEVER RIDE AGAINST TRAFFIC

Ride on the right with the flow of traffic—NEVER ride against traffic on the road, in a bike lane, or on a sidewalk. Drivers turning from the side cannot see you, and approaching drivers will not expect you to be riding the wrong way.
 

 
     


 

TWO LEGAL LEFT TURNS

  1. You may make a left turn like a vehicle by looking over your shoulder, signaling, and moving into the left turn lane when it’s safe.
     
  2. You may make a left turn by going to the far side of the intersection, turning your bike, and using the crosswalk.
     
 
 

 

 
    WATCH FOR PEDESTRIANS ANYTIME, ANYWHERE
 
 

Driver Safety Tips

Everyone takes on a certain responsibility when they travel, whether it is by walking, bicycling or driving. Driver responsibility starts with obeying the speed limit.

Pedestrians struck by cars at faster speeds suffer more injuries and fatalities. During a vehicle-pedestrian impact, a 2-ton vehicle, equipped with airbags and evolutionary safety features, provides more protection to the driver. A pedestrian or bicyclist, on the other hand, has less protection and will be on the losing end.

Drivers, look for pedestrians anywhere, anytime. Eyes on the road can save a life.

 
         
     



DON’T TEXT AND DRIVE

Cell phones cause distraction and reduce your ability to operate your motor vehicle effectively.
 

 
 


DON’T PASS VEHICLES STOPPED AT CROSSWALKS

When coming up alongside stopped or stopping vehicles, be prepared to stop for pedestrians who are walking in marked or unmarked crosswalks.
 

 


YIELD TO PEDESTRIANS AT MARKED AND UNMARKED CROSSWALKS

Pedestrians have the legal right to cross a roadway at all intersections. On multi-lane roadways, if you come too close to a pedestrian, you may block the next driver from seeing the pedestrian as he or she is crossing the roadway.
 

 
       
     
If you hit a pedestrian going 40 mph, there is an 85% chance of death.


Speed matters.

Slow down.

Save a life.

 

 
 

 
 
YIELD TO PEDESTRIANS WHEN MAKING TURNS

Always be on the lookout for pedestrians, and scan crosswalks before turning. Be aware that your windshield may partially block your view, so make sure the crosswalk is clear before turning.
 

   
     

 

 
    BE VISIBLE AT NIGHT
 
 

Resources

Use any of the outreach materials below to help us in our goal to enhance pedestrian and roadway safety and awareness in our region. Also, check out other bicycle and pedestrian safety programs in our region.  

 
 

Regional Bicycle
& Pedestrian Programs

Arizona Department of Transportation

City of Tucson

Pima Association of Governments

Pima County

Oro Valley
 

Plans & Reports

2015 Report: City of Tucson Bicycle and Pedestrian Program (City of Tucson)

Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Report (PAG)

Regional Pedestrian Plan (PAG)

Regional Plan for Bicycling (PAG)

Regional Sidewalk Inventory (PAG)

University of Arizona Area Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan (UofA & PAG)
 

Bicycle Maps

Tucson Bikeways (PAG)

Tucson Metro Bike Map (Pima Co)

The Loop (Pima Co)

 
Safety Guides

A Bicyclist’s Guide to Traffic Law (Pima Co)

A Guide for Bicyclist & Motorists – Share the Road (Versíon en Español) (Pima Co)    

Pedestrian Safety Brochure (City of Tucson)

Sharing the Road with Pedestrians (Pima Co)

State of Arizona Pedestrian Laws (PAG)
 

Safety Commercials

Radio PSA - Pedestrian Safety (PAG)

Dangers of Distracted Driving (Tucson Police Dept.)

Getting There Safely – Pedestrian Safety (NHTSA)

Pedestrian Motion Graphics – Walking Safely (NHTSA)
 

Video Commercials

Pedestrian Safety (City of Tucson)

Walk Safe. Drive Safe. (PAG)

 

 

 

 

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